4 Steps to Create a Routine

Developing a routine can give you a sense of control in a world where things are constantly changing. It can lower your stress levels and give you a healthy mindset.

So, to help you feel successful and accomplished, here are some tips to create a routine that keeps you on track and allows you to complete all of your big ticket items!

1. Make a list of 1-5 things

This is not a complete brain dump. Be very clear and direct about these items. Make only 1-3 of things be big ticket items. Many of these things can be small too. Creating short, clear lists will allow you to stay focused, efficient and limit the possibility of getting overwhelmed and procrastinating. That’s it. Do your 5 and you’re “done” for the day. Anything else is a bonus.

For example, here is Patricia’s sample list.

  • Read 10 pages of self development
  • Workout for 45 minutes
  • Walk the dog
  • Finalize Trademark Application
  • Create programming for week of Sep 1 and film demo videos for teachers

2. Schedule your day

Are you an early bird or night owl? Neither is right or wrong. You should schedule your day around when you are most alert and creative. Set yourself up for success by penciling in when you will execute your list of 1-5.

Here is Patricia’s example.

  • 4AM: Read 10 pages of self development (while drinking coffee)
  • 5AM: Workout for 45 minutes
    • Because there is not a live class to attend at this time, I like to access the on demand library and pull a video. If I want 45 minutes of HIIT, I’ll do 6 rounds of a HIIT 30 class, or just do two different videos with a water break in between.
  • 6AM: Walk the dog
  • 7-9AM: Shower, breakfast and emails
  • 9AM: Finalize Trademark Application
  • 10AM – 4PM: Create programming for week of Sep 1 and film demo videos for teachers

Download this Schedule Planner to help you create a detailed routine.

3. Highlight your non-negotiables

Scheduling time for flexibility is great. We have to adapt to change daily, because we know it’s inevitable. But, what are things you know you can knock out as long as true emergencies don’t arise? And, when is the most realistic time that you can accomplish them? I like to put my non negotiables as early in the day as possible because I know most others are sleeping and I’ll be less likely to be interrupted. I also leave a large window for the longer projects so I don’t feel rushed if I am interrupted. This allows me to be successful and calm throughout the day.

  • 4AM: Read 10 pages of self development (while drinking coffee) NON NEGOTIABLE
  • 5AM: Workout for 45 minutes
  • 6AM: Walk the dog NON NEGOTIABLE
  • 7-9AM: Shower, breakfast and emails
  • 9AM: Finalize Trademark Application
  • 10AM – 4PM: Create programming for week of Sep 1 and film demo videos for teachers FLEXIBLE

4. Take your new routine for a test drive

Try your plan for 5 weeks to see if it’s something that will work for your long term, with the exception of minor tweaks along the way. Ask yourself, How does this routine make me feel each day? At the end of the week? Does this routine allow me to complete 1-3 big or uber important tasks each day?

For Patricia, moving each day is a non negotiable: “Moving allows me to be clear headed, calm and positive. Without that, nothing else works.”

What non negotiables do you have that will set your routine up for success?